Civics and Commentary

Civic Commentary looks at what is affecting citizens in the U.S. and the world. Look for news on politics and government (which are not, contrary to common belief, the same) here, passed on to you from a liberal viewpoint.

I created this site for two reasons:

  1. The 2008 elections promised to be unique in our national history–the top two Democratic contenders were a former first lady and black man in his first Senate term, with an unusual background. Hate and hope were out in full force, and people–including me–were suddenly passionate about the coming election.
  2. The commentary was not at all civil.
  3. My four children–who ranged from 16 to 21–had never had a Civics class. Not because they opted not to take one, but because it wasn’t available.

civic

adjective

1. of or relating to a city; municipal:

civic problems.
2. of or relating to citizenship; civil:

civic duties.
3. of citizens:

civic pride.

Now we’ll add an “s”

Civics

noun, ( used with a singular verb)
1. the study or science of the privileges and obligations of citizens.
Privileges.


How many people consider themselves privileged because they are a citizen of the United States? From that number, remove the individuals who became legal citizens by passing the test (call them first generation Americans). How many are left? Most of the citizens who feel it’s a privilege are immediate descendants of the latter; second- or third-generation Americans. If you look at the discourse from people who have been here long enough to not know what “generation” they belong to, you’ll see that most of them don’t consider it a privilege. They consider it a right. As something they deserve, by virtue of their long-lost ancestors’ choice to move to the U.S.; with bonus points if said ancestors were here before this country was formed.

Admission: I don’t know how Native Americans, as a group, tend to feel about their “privilege” of citizenship, but I’m assuming it is tinged with some completely reasonable bitterness. And a different bitterness is felt by people whose ancestors were property, people who didn’t have a choice.

Politic

adjective
1. shrewd or prudent in practical matters; tactful; diplomatic.
2. contrived in a shrewd and practical way; expedient:

a politic reply.
Let’s add “al”.

Political

adjective
1. of, relating to, or concerned with politics :

political writers.
2. of, relating to, or connected with a political party:

a political campaign.
3. exercising or seeking power in the governmental or public affairs of a state, municipality, etc.:

a political machine; a political boss.
4. of, relating to, or involving the state or its government:

a political offense.
5. having a definite policy or system of government:

a political community.
6. of or relating to citizens:

political rights.

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