September 2008: Are you better off now than 4 years ago?

 

September, 2008: Two months before Election Day, the economy tanked.

Romney uses it as a mating call, but simple subtraction reveals the truth.

Are you better off than you were four years ago? If you’re like most Americans, that answer is yes. Let’s think about this for a minute:

Mitt Romney assumes no one is bright enough to subtract four from 2012. Hint to conservatives: That would make it 2008. September of 2008.

What happened during September of 2008? The United State’s economic bubbles popped in a spectacular burst, garnering national and global attention.

Four years ago, the American economy tanked. Although Americans had already begun feeling the effects, most of the fireworks on Wall Street began exploding in September, 2008. If you were watching the news, if you were listening with even half an ear to the  presidential campaign, you’ll remember that both Senator Obama and Senator McCain went to DC for an emergency meeting in September.

September 15, 2008:  Barack Obama’s campaign was running an ad featuring John McCain saying the ‘fundamentals of the economy are strong‘.

September 24, 2008: John McCain announced he was suspending his campaign to deal with the financial crisis. He called on Obama to do the same.

Obama disagreed, saying it was “more important than ever” for the candidates to tell voters how they would deal with the crisis. He said they can work with Congress while campaigning. “It is going to be part of the president’s job to deal with more than one thing at once,” Obama said.

It was reasonable for Obama to point out that McCain was out of touch with the financial challenges of the average American. It’s reasonable–and very, very easy–to point out that Mitt Romney is out of touch with that same thing.

In fairness to Senator McCain, let me say that Mitt Romney is so stupendously ignorant of any “typical” American’s financial issues that his knowledge and understanding would easily be surpassed by, say, the typical Martian.

 

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